Rliberni's Blog – Radical language

November 14, 2011

More and more Edcamps are springing up nationally. What are the advantages/disadvantages of edcamps/TeachMeets vs traditional PD?

#Edchat 11 – 01 – 2011 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST

Last Tuesday’s #edchat summary has not only been written by (John Walters) @TestSoup but has also been hosted on the Test Soup blog! This chat introduced these new forms of PD to the very interested and motivated group of educators present at the discussion. Many people wanted to get started and organise their own and there were suggestions of collaborations afoot. This could be the beginning of an explosion of such events. It’s a great summary and captures the mood of the chat as well as the valuable content. Thank you John.

Head over to the Test Soup website to read the summary:

http://blog.testsoup.com/edchat-summary-11-8-11/

Here’s a video of our #edchat moderator @cybraryman introducing an Edcamp and below a few links to help you find out more or start up your own.

@cybraryman1: The #edcamp Wiki http://t.co/A22HQPps  TeachMeet schedule: http://t.co/eM87KlGv  #edchat

 @cybraryman1: My #edcamp/TeachMeet page: http://t.co/lz5tdqN1  #edchat

 @Navicomm: Edcamps or traditional prof dev, should k-12 and higher ed collaborate more? http://t.co/K8pLHWiE  #edchat

@tomwhitby:  Anyone can Join the Teachmeet/Edcamp Organizer Group They will help you with questions on edcamps. http://t.co/Wt9wQYVR  #Edchat

@CTuckerEnglish: After attending EdCampSFBay, I was energized, excited & ready to share what I learned. http://t.co/7pf99aiN  #edchat

@EdTechHawkeye about his first #edcamp experience this past Saturday at #edcampkc http://t.co/rxbd83vM  #edchat

 Be inspired!

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August 2, 2011

In light of education reform, what will a teacher look like and be doing 10 years from today?

 

#Edchat 08 – 26 – 2011 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST

Great video isn’t it! I love the idea that we will be able to access the internet EVERYWHERE! I learned about this video from a student who works for Corning and he told me that all of this is possible now. The incredible flexibility of glass as a material for technology is mind-blowing and to think that it is such an ancient product – it makes you think! Can you imagine greeting your students on the door of their refrigerator each morning  before they come to school? It’s so exciting! And how about the whole wall that turns into a screen – awesome!  I want one in my classroom! The world might look SO different in 10 years from now.

This was our topic last week at #edchat and we have a really amazing summary here written by Tracy Brady @mmebrady) who is a vibrant and innovative edchatter and this was a great ‘blue-sky thinking’ #edchat session. Tracy has really captured some of that excitement and buzz that was flying around twitter during the hour. I’m sure you will love reading her summary here and you can find out more about Tracy and her work as a French teacher in New York at the end of the post. Thank you so much Tracy for this great post 🙂

This topic provided for a phenomenal opportunity to discuss our “educational wishlists” and imagine the future.  Thinking back 10 years at how different things were, I think most of us realize that although much has changed (technology) sadly, much still remains the same (bureaucrats, the have-nots, row seating, farm-based schedule, standardized tests…).  Many of the ideas put forth were fascinating, exciting, thought-provoking, fill in your own blank.  Looking to the future is always a fun exercise, but it was also pointed out, that we need to focus our efforts on the classes of 10 minutes from now — exert control over our own realm.

Here are some of the main themes from the discussion: 

  •  Classrooms will be paperless
  •  Will the digital divide widen or narrow — (between students as well as schools)  will the bureaucrats still be in control? where should the $ be spent?
  •  Classrooms should be more student centered with passion based learning and more individualized instruction — “communities of inquiry”
  •  Teacher prep needs to change significantly
  •  Communication will be improved as learning continues outside class walls and time (perhaps year round?) — mobilization, globalization, and collaboration
  •  There will be more flipped /blended classes — the human element (interpersonal) will always be necessary
  •  PLN/PD needs to be ongoing — teachers will need to continue to develop their own skills to continue to be relevant
  •  We should see the end of standardized tests — authentic assessment should replace it
  •  flying robots — it is hard to envision the future based on how different things were 10 years ago — like predicting a hurricane
  •  We will see the end of filtering websites, and  teach digital citizenship  instead.  We will take advantage of the digital native status of students AND teachers — byod
  •  We will see new learning spaces (not just formal rows inside classroom walls)
Here is a selection of some of the comments: 
 

CoachB0066 Looking at the economic landscape I believe that BYOD programs will be more popular than pure 1:1 programs

USCTeacher 10 years-teachers will be even more tech savvy, assignments will be submitted paperless, and schools will continue refining tech use

inquirebook @mmebrady I think tech will continue to change so fast that everybody will have to constantly learn and adapt.

inquirebook Technology is really just about connecting students to teachers and to each other, and connecting all to information.

stumpteacher My hope is that in 10 years our government listens to teachers and not businessmen/cheaters

stumpteacher @cybraryman1 I would hope the teachers continue to step back and empower students. Give up more control of learning to students.

NoodleEducation @rliberni would like to see technology provide objective assessment on a more holistic level for indiv students to replace STD tests

allisonletts @MarkWinegar one step: students pursuing a passion during classtime–learning how to learn independently about something fascinating

USCTeacher @rliberni Think about the communities that will be able to form! Not 1 building, 1 community, but 1 world

2footgiraffe @NathanSandberg @stumpteacher agreed. Tech is not the answer in education. It is just one part of student engagement.

CTuckerEnglish I’d like to see a move to customize & individualized instruction using tech integration to meet diverse needs if students

lauwailap1 In 10 yrs:Hoping teachers will have more control + input in the curriculum, which should be flexible+allow us to constantly innovate.

love_teach Schools need to prep them on how to facilitate learning and how to guide students to discover their own knowledge and tools

after_school 10 yrs from now more kinds of people will be recognized as teachers: museum/library/afterschool staff, kids leading othr kids.

CrudBasher I predict in 10 yrs, the most valuable skill in the world will be the ability to learn anything at anytime.

saraallen91 2 prepare tchrs 10 yrs from now, we have 2 prepare them 2 constantly challenge their thinking, experiment w/ new tech, & take risks.

Akevy613 In 10 years learning should be mobile and global and move way beyond the walls of a classroom

pernilleripp
I hope in 10 years teachers start to get respect again

inquirebook @cybraryman1 I hope augmented reality is ubiquitous–another change to our relationship with information.

drdouggreen @ShellTerrell Let’s stop building schools with rows of identical classrooms and more open areas. Some are.

ShellTerrell Perhaps 10yrs from now we have better solutions to improving schools rather than firing teachers

mrbarranca @drdouggreen @beyondtech1 That’s a great point. Can’t teach new teachers 1980-1990 practices and expect them to then be cutting edge

CrudBasher You can plan the education system in 10 years in the same way you can plan a hurricane. #beyondcontrol

drdouggreen @jenniferg92 All teachers must be comfortable learning from students. It empowers both.

MaryAnnReilly The division we know among teacher, student, coach, mentor, and community member will blur. We will need new language to name.

chrisemdin I love the idea of predicting what you want things to be like in 10yrs. Imagination is the seedbed of possibility

 To follow the complete discussion see here

For the stats on #edchat participation see here 

As ever, there were some great links shared:

ShellTerrell: Educators on Google+ http://bit.ly/oz4qK8  #edtech #edchat

CoachB0066:  We need to focus on educator prep (teachers and admin) to change pedagogy #edchat We can infuse all the tech… (cont) http://deck.ly/~WT9C4

cybraryman1:  What role will Blended Learning http://tinyurl.com/483kbhl  have in the future? #edchat

briankotts: The BBC believes most people will have read only 6 of the 100 books here http://bit.ly/dT2u47  #edchat #ukedchat

SnaPanda: RT @rscon3: Check out: Sharing values in the classroom: When, How, Y & Y not http://bit.ly/pJdN41   video by @brad5patterson #eltchat #edchat

findingDulcinea: Awesome commentary on EdTech RT @mcleod My opening remarks at Iowa Education Summit http://t.co/8Oul1kM  #edchat #sschat

iObservation:  New York State Education Department Approves Dr. Robert Marzano’s Teacher Evaluation Model http://bit.ly/mnnS86  #cpchat #edchat

Kerry_EasyBib: @NMHS_Principal was featured in USA Today in a great article about social media and the future of the classroom http://ow.ly/5NHL6  #edchat

drdouggreen: @malcolmbellamy Colleges serve to widen gap between haves & have nots. Check my summary of Academically Adrift http://bit.ly/oCig5G  #edchat

cybraryman1: What role will Augmented Reality (http://tinyurl.com/346ogtf ) play in education in the future: #edchat

cybraryman1: My Student Centered Classrooms page: http://tinyurl.com/454czsq  #edchat

rliberni: Here’s a great vision for the future with tech everywhere! http://youtu.be/6Cf7IL_eZ38  #edchat

cybraryman1: Personalized, passionate learning http://goo.gl/fb/jJhR3  #edchat

iObservation:  Video: Robert Marzano on His Career in Research http://youtu.be/G0yOZpPSu7s  #edchat #education

cybraryman1: I can see more Self-Directed Learning http://tinyurl.com/3yzrakm  with teacher there to faciliate the learning #edchat

drwetzel: What is the Technology Footprint in Your Classroom? http://t.co/9A67ruv  #edtech #edchat #elemchat #teaching #education #web20

tuchodi:  @ShellTerrell From our school district http://bit.ly/q7JzvN  #edchat

web20education:  Pls rt I work #edtech20 #socialmedia #curation project gateway to knowledge in #education20 , I need #PLN help #edchat http://t.co/WvMFXQh

cybraryman1: @lauwailap1 See Open Doors School-Business Partnership (left column down) http://tinyurl.com/4zyk5qq  #edchat

engaginged:  Interested in global collaboration? Here’s a great project: Challenge 20/20: http://t.co/CyxrsYo  #globaled #edchat

AAEteachers: #Education is hurt by #politics according to Arne Duncan. #teachers – what do you think? | http://is.gd/xIS2v3  #edreform #edchat

CrudBasher: @SamGliksman Reading expressions online. http://bit.ly/nzWq8I  #edchat

Social_LMS: 2011 Learning Tools Directory : http://t.co/YjZLRGb  #lrnchat #edchat #ednewschat

mjgormans:  10 Steps to Transform Past Lessons for 21st Century .,, If u r at #BLC11 plz stop in at 1 of my sessions http://t.co/XNrOJ9A  #edchat

OECD_Edu: PISA – Against the Odds: Disadvantaged Students Who Succeed in School http://bit.ly/nbEIdO  #edchat #ukedchat #finnedchat

joe_bower:  Assessment wagging the dog http://t.co/iT9TXPe  #abed #edchat #edtech

web20education:  I update #curation story #googleplus gateway to #semanticweb #web30 in #education20 http://t.co/EOISqqY  #edtech20 #edreform #rscon3 #edchat

My name is Tracy Brady  I am a French teacher (middle and high school) in Central New York.  I strive to push against constraints of time and space to globalize my students’ learning experience.    I am a strong proponent of BYOD and thinking outside the box to bridge the digital divide.  My colleagues don’t always know what to make of my wild ideas, but then again, neither do my 2 beautiful daughters (Florica and Aline).  Sometimes it takes a little bit of crazy to get the job done.  #edchat is an invaluable tool in my PD arsenal, and I am honored to have been asked to write this summary.  My blog can be found at http://mmetechie.blogspot.com
 

New to Edchat?

If you have never participated in an #Edchat discussion, these take place twice a day every Tuesday on Twitter. Over 1,000 educators participate in this discussion by just adding #edchat to their tweets. For tips on participating in the discussion, please check out these posts!

More Edchat

Challenge:

If you’re new to hashtag discussions, then just show up on Twitter on any Tuesday and add just a few tweets on the topic with the hashtag #edchat. 

What do you think? Leave a comment!

July 15, 2011

6262011 – Special ISTE edition – How are education conferences to stay relevant in a free Internet

#Edchat 06 – 21 – 2011 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST

Mea maxima culpa! This is sooo late. Apologies to everyone and above all to Doug Green who prepared this fabulous post. A combination teaching and then a horrible throat infection 😦

This truly is a fabulous post. But was truly a fabulous #edchat with all that energy coming from the ISTE11 conference and all those great edchatters in one room! I think Doug has done a great job in capturing some of that energy and although the benefits of online PD via online conferences was explored and acknowledged to be invaluable, the sheer power coming from the delegates at ISTE11 couldn’t be ignored and there is a need to meet face to face and have that boost of learning that only a live event can give. Thank you again Doug for a great post. You can find out more about Doug and his amazing productivity in the field of education in his bio at the end of the post. Please take some time to visit hos blog to find out more!

Modern education conferences are changing to allow for more interaction and participation online by those who cannot attend. There is agreement that there is no substitute for face to face meetings and that ideally educators can profit from both face to face and online sources of professional development. It’s hard to match the hands-on benefits conferences offer.

Here are some of the main themes from the discussion: 

  • Some were concerned about the costs of conference registration and other associated costs. A great deal of online activity is free.
  • Modern conferences allow for some level of participation of people who cannot physically attend.
  • Face to face meetings are not the same as online meetings but both are valuable. Ideally you can have both. The hands-on aspect of conferences may be the most valuable part.
  • Thanks to back channels, modern conferences already combine face to face and online aspects.
  • Some people wouldn’t know about things like Edchat and other valuable resources if they didn’t attend conferences like ISTE11.
  • Following conference hashtags can extend the conference in time. You can start to participate before you get there, check the back channel at the conference, and follow it after you get home. You also interact online with people you meet after the conference.
  • Many people would like conferences to be more interactive with shorter presentations and/or presentations available online. The TED model of presentations was cited by some as an improvement over longer presentations.

Here is a selection of some of the comments: 

With such a vibrant discussion, it’s almost impossible to do it justice in a summary, but I’ve picked out some of the comments that caught my eye

ShellTerrell @stumpteacher absolutely agree that the human connection is important

DrDougGreen There is no substitute for face to face. The trick is to keep the cost down like #140conf. I would be in Philly if iSTE charged $140 #edchat

agutierrezIT Can stay relevant by continuing to having great Keynote speakers, accepting unique sessions/presenters, & strive to be unique

blairteach Conference sponsors are going to HAVE to have wireless access or they will appear “dated” & out-of-touch

tecjtromom ed conferences need to model using tools from the web in all topic areas

daveski61 Personal interaction remains critical. A virtual handshake isn’t as good as a physical handshake.

malalande Asynchronous is great for some activities, but not ideal for hands-on where I-to-eye feedback is relevant

blairtech IMO, conferences offer great opportunities to connect f2f w/our online colleagues & there’s great value in building relationships.

techtrimom @web20classroom: face to face contact will never die and so these conferences are invigorating and very important

blairtech Conferences can be very motivational; the online PD can extend the enthusiasm kindled at the live event.

earthspacequest Physical presence has more power to inspire than online friendships!

elanaleoni @ShellTerrell Human connection is def important but we need to reinvent conference structures to become more relevant.

elanaleoni Instead of lectures & ppts, let’s do interactive/collaborative workshops where participants can try things & fail & try again 🙂

tkraz A real place to gather as a community will always be important. It’s what makes the community stronger.

rjwassink @drdouggreen Its not the random relationships, but meeting virtual friends in real life after getting to know them digitally is key

davidwees How many educators here actually pay 100% attention during a 1 hr lecture? PD should be more interactive.

I’ve been following the #iste11 hashtag since October and will continue to follow it. No more one shot conferences.

tkraz Conferences are getting tougher to pay for with so much available for free online

caroljallen @davidwees Agree and in my case I find a ‘hands on’ element the most useful

bjnichols Discussion is great either f2f or virtual…I am more interested in the action that results from discussion

davidwees You should expect teachers to engage in PD somehow. Extrinsic motivation like money will serve to kill interest and passion

MrBernia I’d love a flipped conference, where attendees listen to a presentation before, then attend and collaborate with the presenter.

davidwees Suggestion: If you are running a conference, offer at least one option for unconference style learning

To follow the complete discussion see here 

For the stats on #edchat participation see here 

As ever, there were some great links shared:

Wow, what a lot this week!

@jpk38:  http://t.co/o6769ql  #iste11 #edchat Collaborative notes, please share and add to. Lets learn from the whole as well as r parts!

@ILT2012: Experience Some of the International Society for Technology in Education Conference without being there: http://t.co/uHiBoUN  #ISTE11 #edchat

@MoodleMcKean: Cool Websites – 21st Century School Teacher http://bit.ly/ieF5i8  #edchat #lrnchat #edtech #elearning #webtools #websites #tlchat #education

@businesscardsav: and who would I give my business cards to w/out ISTE? #edchat http://bit.ly/h3OIKg

@rkiker: Sneak peek at my Emerging Google Tech preso in the Google Teaching Theater at 12:30 Wed. Come by! #ISTE11 http://goo.gl/OVh96  #edchat

@KevinfMcCabe: take look at this @DavidPriceOBE: New on Blog: Michael Gove and ‘respect’ for teachers: http://t.co/TjQuWL3  #edchat #ukedchat

@SErwin: Great tool. “@russeltarr: YouCube: Students choose 6 relevant vids for a topic, then present them with this: http://t.co/vFijP7Q   #edchat

@NextGenLC: Schools Blend Computers With Classroom Learning via @nprnews http://ow.ly/5pVRj   #edtech #edchat

@amckiel: Magical Moments http://bit.ly/kgIXgG  #edchat

@aaallain: Let Me Learn My Own Way- fantastic article on Jungian learning styles with a math twist! http://bit.ly/lMdnZZ  #math #edchat #homeschool

@azjd: Separate process of work from the product of work – by @davidwees http://is.gd/la9fA7  #edchat

@davidwees: Here’s an example of what I mean. “The Best Professional Development of My Life” http://t.co/PalivcP  #edchat #iste11

@tadawes: 13 Things You Pay For That Your Library Has For Free http://bit.ly/lg8erv  #bibliotek #edchat

@ekendriss: WiFi nonaccess @ f2f conf #edchat #ISTE RT @jranck: Epidemiology and social media: conference fail http://j.mp/jEICM0

@MarjieKnudsen: The 3 most important questions in education – Wash Post http://t.co/xLLSDxb  #edchat #parenting #education

@joycevalenza: Camilla will share list of great ipad apps for ed in wiki #iste11 Leadership Symp. Wiki http://t.co/7UplyzC  #tlchat #edchat

@RealLifeUnplugd: Sweden Tackles Gender in Classroom http://bit.ly/mDI64m  #k12 #edchat

@drtimony: You see this badge? http://ow.ly/5qydn  This is MY town, errr, presentation. #edchat #iste11

@gingerconsult: @humekaren: How kids are affected in the age of multi-tasking http://ow.ly/5ndap  #edchat #edtech #adhd #education

@azjd: Is this the future of learning? Sophia – Social Learning Community – by @InnovativeEdu http://is.gd/yLPPAG  #edchat #edtech

@EdutopiaBetty: Thanks for a great day, #ebc11! My Report from EduBloggerCon11 at #ISTE11 http://bit.ly/meDZfh  #edchat

@joycevalenza: Camilla will share list of great ipad apps for ed in wiki #iste11 Leadership Symp. Wiki http://t.co/7UplyzC  #tlchat #edchat

@8Amber8: darn it #edchat!!! Quit bng so engaging!! http://lockerz.com/s/114374558

@drtimony: Teach like this: http://ow.ly/5qyoC  trust your students, no matter who they are, collectively possess much info #edchat #iste11

@DavidPriceOBE: New on the Blog: Michael Gove and ‘respect’ for teachers: http://bit.ly/iEOjTn  #edchat #ukedchat #clvfestival

@lookforsun: Looking for a 15 minute option? See this picture. http://bit.ly/j3xSG8  #edchat

@ILT2012: Experience Some of the International Society for Technology in Education Conference without being there: http://t.co/uHiBoUN  #ISTE11 #edchat

@azjd: So You Want to Integrate Technology – Now What? Via @4thGrdTeach http://is.gd/YcSnGW  #edtech #edchat

@azjd:10 videos that WILL ignite a discussion – Part 5: great resource from @justintarte http://is.gd/uZVyru  #edchat #cpchat

@tcbird1: I love this article! Teachers are the educational experts http://t.co/26m2TUt  #edchat #edreform #politics #education

@blairteach: Admins & Tchrs: Would appreciate additional input on value of PLN (if you haven’t already contributed).Thx. http://bit.ly/kKKR2V  #edchat

@davidwees: This picture describes to me the value of the unconference model of PD. http://t.co/8FiZ3Br  #edchat #iste11

@blairteach: @web20classroom Sometimes use this article to prompt discussion of change: http://bit.ly/9hSKFt   #edchat

@EDREFORMERIFFIC: INEPTION http://post.ly/2FWx3  @NBCNews @AdamVerdugo @meetthepress #StandUpNJ #Edchat

@dlpd17: @teachingwthsoul: @BuckleyLibrary G-Doc with Twitter Chat schedules~>> http://tinyurl.com/66ar5v9  #edchat #iste11

@stumpteacher: @mbteach Any newbies need help with twitter/tweetdeck feel free to share some tutorials on my page. http://j.mp/f5RUbv  #edchat

@azjd: Look where you want to go and steer in that direction: How a blog started a school – via @ktenkely http://is.gd/l87ian  #edchat

@KTVee: holy schmoly – next time someone says there’s “nothin’ on twitter” show them this! http://t.co/S2PaMkM  (Thanks @ljconrad) #edchat #ISTE11

@HappyTeacherLA: @PatParslow this is kind of heavy, but this is one of my guides of what’s my point. http://t.co/lAT5TYu  #edchat

@gwynethjones: Lady GaGa Librarians Unite! http://t.co/uelGRG9  #ISTE11 #TLChat #EdChat @ladygaga #SIGMS

@johnnybevacqua: Love is not enough http://t.co/5hN0uHM  by @DrTroyRoddy #bced #cpchat #edchat

@cybraryman1: My all about #EdChat page with pictures from today’s session at #ISTE11 http://tinyurl.com/4f8pqfn

@DelaneyKirk: @michellek107 @mrsalander Michelle-great post on building PLN! OK if I link to on my blog? http://t.co/rvWfHXe  #edchat

Dr. Doug Green. @drdouggreen

I have been an educator since 1970. After teaching chemistry, physics, and computer science, I became an administrator for the next 30 years with experience at the secondary, central office, and elementary levels. I have also taught a number of leadership courses for The State University of New York at Cortland and Binghamton University and authored over 300 articles in computer magazines and educational journals. In 2006 I gave up my job as an elementary principal to care for my wife who had Lou Gehrig’s disease. After her death in March of 2009 I decided to see how I could use my expertise to help busy educators and parents hone their skills and knowledge. Doug’s blog can be found here.

New to Edchat?

If you have never participated in an #Edchat discussion, these take place twice a day every Tuesday on Twitter. Over 1,000 educators participate in this discussion by just adding #edchat to their tweets. For tips on participating in the discussion, please check out these posts!

More Edchat

Challenge:

If you’re new to hashtag discussions, then just show up on Twitter on any Tuesday and add just a few tweets on the topic with the hashtag #edchat. 

What do you think? Leave a comment!

 

June 14, 2011

What advantages could be gained by using criteria other than age to group kids in classes?

#Edchat 06 – 08 – 2011 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST

Thank you to Pam Wesely (@pamwesely) for this summary on what turned out to be a very interesting chat. There were many ideas and many reservations too which all made for a very thought-provoking discussion. Pam has captured all of this to great effect in this summary. Thank you Pam for a great roundup of the ideas and themes and a thoughtful commentary on the topic. Find out more about Pam in her bio at the end of the post.

The participants in this #edchat talk all heartily agreed that grouping kids by criteria other than age has been under explored in current educational practices.  We were able to identify an array of positives to grouping by things other than age, often focusing on the ability to individualize instruction and encourage peer-to-peer mentoring and cooperation more effectively.
    Beyond this response to the initial prompt, participants in this #edchat discussion addressed several other related topics, notably: WHAT CRITERIA the alternate groupings would have, WHAT SCOPE the alternate groupings would have, WHICH LEVELS of students are grouped by age (and which should be), and WHY we currently group students by age.  As I tend to be more conservative in the #edchat discussions, I was pleased to see participants even offer reasons why this grouping does make sense in some cases.  
    Upon reflection, I see lots of areas where educators can expand on this discussion, notably in including and considering other stakeholders in education; developing the notion of groupings that vary throughout one child’s day; and considering the ways that peer mentoring can become more a part of classroom practice.

Here are some of the main themes from the discussion: 

  • Decisions about promotion that completely disregarded age (as @LHoog eloquently put it, putting the «child genius who’s 8 with 14-year-olds”) was not seen as preferable.  Participants still felt for the most part that age (or developmental level) needed to be considered in grouping students.
  • Participants shared personal experiences about observing older and younger students working together – both well and not-so-well.
  • Types of alternate grouping suggested included interest/project grouping, ability grouping, mastery grouping, achievement grouping, and grouping in peer-mentor relationships.
  • Perhaps the most common rhetorical flourishes critiquing age grouping were references to non-school-based contexts – the idea that «ages are mixed up in X context, why do we force such an unnatural grouping in schools!» with X context being playgrounds, adult workplaces, sports teams, etc.
  • Where some participants thought that avoiding age grouping would help students find like-minded allies of any age, others argued that the academically adept but socially underdeveloped would suffer if advancement were based on academic criteria.  
  • An important point of contention that emerged at the end of the discussion involved how, exactly, teachers would decide how students would advance to the next level, if not somehow by age.

Here is a selection of some of the comments: 

 @nancyrubin: Group stronger academic students with those that need a little more help for peer mentoring opportunities.
@MertonTech: The biggest issue is that academic maturity and social maturity are not always the same.
@USCTeacher: Many factors could be used to categorize students: age, gender, economic standing, performance – how are we to determine what is fair or works?
@tomwhitby: If age was not an issue, social promotion or non-promotion would not be one either.
@darcymullin: Multi-aged groupings (or other methods) also force us to look at our pedagogy and re-think what and how we deliver instruction.
@QZLPatriotHawk: This is not a one-size-fits-all debate. I believe you have to look at the students as individuals. Schooling is so much more than about academics.
@CTuckerEnglish: Maturity can be an issue, but there’s value in having older kids lead, support & guide younger students.
@rliberni: I think the older kids also learn from the younger ones – re-igniting their curiosity.
@JasonFlom: I think there need to be opportunities for ages to mix, regularly, but social development is so key early on.
@ShellTerrell: I’d like to see parents, students, & teachers collaborate in placing the student.
@karimderrick: We should also not group by subject….but instead by project! How great would that be!!
@tomwhitby: Ability should be a part of it but too much emphasis on any component will affect the result. Balance is the key.

@coreydahlevent: Is the question about age or ability, or is it about TEACHERS allowing or NOT allowing extended learning?
@karimderrick: Mixed-age groups would ultimately be more natural – same age groups is a product of factory schooling.
@Sam_EnglishEd: In mentoring group, 17-yr-old to me: “I don’t want to be with these little KIDS.” These KIDS were 14-15. Complaint often heard.
@BrandiJClark: Focus on the learning, not the sifting and sorting.
@malcolmbellamy: We mature at different rates, and not according to the year we were born.
@mrmadden77: I’m still concerned with ability grouping – worried that focus will become too much about curriculum, not enough about the child.

@JohnMikulski: For ability grouping to be successful, there has to be fluid movement from one group to next when student shows improvement.
@JasonFlom: “Fluid movement” for a teacher is one thing. “Fluid movement” for students in social groups is another.

To follow the complete discussion see here  
For the stats on #edchat participation see here 

As ever, there were some great links shared:

@NextGenLC:  What’s been your experiences with programs like this? “Some schools grouping students by skill, not grade level” http://ow.ly/5caH4  #edchat
@NextGenLC:  @pamwesely This #edchat has me thinking about Malcolm Gladwell’s ‘Outliers’ argument about cutoff dates for kindergarten http://ow.ly/5cbf0

@NextGenLC: @brandiheinz Me too. Just found this post about the “Outliers” argument: http://ow.ly/5cbqX  #edchat

@allisonletts: the Changing Ed Paradigms Video by @sirkenrobinson http://ow.ly/5bgEa  #edchat

@davidwees: Here’s a study about pros and cons of older/younger sibling pairs. Some good stuff, some not so good. http://bit.ly/iHBGZ1  #edchat

@nancyrubin: Collaborative Learning: Group and Teams in the Classroom http://t.co/yAndKbk   #edchat

@karimderrick: Assess perf in proj orientated groups NOT using criteria – but comparative judgement http://bit.ly/dP6O8E  Bye, bye stand tests #edchat

@darcymullin: @JasonFlom check out this awesome school in Aus. Very cool http://bit.ly/lefZ72  #edchat

@pamwesely: @rliberni That’s true after I tweeted that I remembered this great film abt a 1-rm school – Etre et Avoir http://imdb.to/8r71Rt  #edchat

@ToughLoveforX: @WendyGorton @ShellTerrell Crowdsourcing Authority in the Classroom http://ilnk.me/8d36  by @catinstack

@mister_jim: #edchat sorry, a bit behind but aren’t we missing the point? Teachers enable learning situations. Shouldn’… (cont) http://deck.ly/~kiq6j

@irasocol: http://www.fsd.k12.ca.us/menus/k8/addmat.pdf   #edchat the K-8 advantage

@irasocol: Philadelphia K-8 analysis http://www.csos.jhu.edu/new/Comparing%20Achievement.pdf  #edchat

@johnpassantino:  Students progress at own pace: Adams County District Standards-based Education model http://bit.ly/lO5ut3  #edchat

@tomwhitby: My latest Post dealing with Filters, Bans & AUP’s: “How do we fit the policy to the need?” http://nblo.gs/iM77n   #Edchat

                                                 

Pam Wesely is an Assistant Professor of Foreign Language and English as a Second Language Education at the University of Iowa. She teaches teachers and people who want to research education.  Her research interests include K-12 student, teacher, and parent beliefs about foreign language education.  She also harbors a growing interest in how teachers use Web 2.0 tools to connect and teach their students.  She is a former middle school French teacher and Concordia Language Villages counselor/administrator.  You can see her professional website at: http://sites.google.com/site/pamelawesely

New to Edchat?

If you have never participated in an #Edchat discussion, these take place twice a day every Tuesday on Twitter. Over 1,000 educators participate in this discussion by just adding #edchat to their tweets. For tips on participating in the discussion, please check out these posts!

More Edchat

Challenge:

If you’re new to hashtag discussions, then just show up on Twitter on any Tuesday and add just a few tweets on the topic with the hashtag #edchat. 

What do you think? Leave a comment!

June 7, 2011

What additions or changes can colleges make to better prepare teacher?

#Edchat 05 – 31 – 2011 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST

This #edchat topic was a very interesting one. There seemed to be many different experiences among the group. The summary has been expertly prepared by Michael Zimmer (@MZimmer557) and he has brought together all the threads into a great digest of all the thoughts. As he explains here our world today is somewhat different from the one many of us trained for. Thank you for a great post Michael. You can find out more about Michael in his bio at the end of the post.

Having missed the passed few #edchats because of other obligations, it appeared that I returned for a thought-provoking discussion about teacher education programs.  My personal experiences were mixed.  I had several good professors and several others who obviously were out of touch with what education was like in the 90’s and now in the 21st Century.  Education is constantly going through various reforms, especially lately, yet little emphasis in those reforms has focused on teacher education programs.  Are they working?  Most educators have heard the statistic that half of the new teachers leave the profession within the first 5 years.  If that is the case, then shouldn’t there be a focus on those that are preparing teachers for the workplace?  If teacher education programs are properly preparing students for the classroom this statistic would not be so staggering.   

    Another issue facing teacher education programs is preparing teachers to teach in the 21st century and prepare teachers to use educational technology.  In my personal experiences in teacher preparation there were two things that were constantly emphasized: My Philosophy of Education and Creating Lesson Plans, which is something over time that has had little impact on my actual teaching.  Beneficial classes would have been how to integrate and use technology with students.  Teacher education programs need to hire professors that are knowledgeable about this technology and how to use it.

    When I look back, it is interesting to me that my teacher education program was about 24-30 hours of course work, but my content area was 3-4 times as much.  If teaching is the primary goal at graduation from college, shouldn’t there be an equal amount of classes.  It is apparent that all that content knowledge won’t help teachers if they don’t get a quality education on how to be a great teacher.  During student teaching we would return to campus and meet with groups of other student teachers.  There was always stuff planned for us.  It would have been more beneficial for us to communicate with each other our experiences. 

Here are some of the main themes from the discussion: 

  • More in class time with students and teachers.  There needs to be more interaction between college students in teacher education with teachers and students in the schools
  • More classes related to learning how to use technology as an engagement tool.
  • To much focus on methodology and theories and not enough focus on real world teaching
  • More mentoring among teachers and professors
  • More opportunities for teachers to get into the classroom while in the teacher education program
  • Professors need to go back to the classroom so they are not out of the loop on what is going on in the classroom
  • More focus on why they teach the content, not necessarily what they content is
  • Teacher preparation needs to include more about classroom management, dealing with parents, the extras duties that come with the job, special education, and school law
  • More emphasis on what it means to teach in the 21st century

Here is a selection of some of the comments: 

With such a vibrant discussion, it’s almost impossible to do it justice in a summary, but I’ve picked out some of the comments that caught my eye.
@CTuckerEnglish: I felt really prepared for teaching, but not for teaching in an increasingly digital society.
@davidwees: Every teacher’s college should spend some time talking alternative education systems. (especially in the 21st century)
@maryannesacco: More time with practical in-class experiences with cooperating teacher–PT conferences, lesson planning, teacher pd meetings
@teachersnet: It can’t be repeated too often: pre-teaching programs must include more classroom management training
@stumpteacher: IMO teacher ed programs I have been in and worked with miss the boat. Teaching kids how to teach 30-50 years ago. Not current.
@iteach4change: teacher ed programs need more on tech, special needs, and politics/finance of education; also more on culturally responsive teaching
@davidwees: Teacher education systems should spend time focusing on building people who expect to learn continuously, rather than sporadically
@kegluskin I had many field placements in different grades &urban & suburban environments which helped me feel comfortable in all settings
@cybraryman1 Yes teachers should be prepared for all different types of learners
@ericjuli Teacher Ed programs should teach high school teachers to believe they teach kids first, not content
@Tina_Barr: More mentoring in the classroom as part of the college curriculum could prove effective
@davidwees: If our classrooms are supposed to be student centred, so too should our teacher colleges.
@tomwhitby: teacher prep might improve if cooperating teachers were trained as to what to do w/student teachers.
@ShellTerrell: Teacher Ed programs should have a course designed on effective communication w/ parents, admin, students! Not enough comm in edu
@davidwees: How many teacher colleges invite alumni back to talk about their experiences? Share their ideas?
@MZimmer557: Allow more teachers with Master’s in education and administration to teach the courses…not professors far removed from classroom
@Whtevri4c: Faculty should go back to the classroom for a semester every three years to stay current.
@tomwhitby: College classes can make good teachers. Great teachers are made from their own classes
@davidwees: Idea: 1 year of preparation followed by 1 year of teaching, followed by a summer (at least) back in teacher college.
@txlibraryguy: Tech skills, theory and practice are great, but young teachers need confidence and coping skills or they won’t stay in profession.
 @chrisemdin: Teacher prep is missing metacognitive reflection. Teachers must learn to think about how & why they teach the way they do

To follow the complete discussion see here 

For the stats on #edchat participation see here 

 As ever, there were some great links shared:

http://davidwees.com/content/apprenticeship-model-teaching

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/7587781.html

http://www.gapfillers.co.uk/default.aspx?atk=6684&vrk=6720

http://mbfxc.wordpress.com/2011/05/17/i-am-change /

http://wrightslaw.com /

– @mbfxc:  http://t.co/V1csZ63  #edchat

My name is Michael Zimmer (@MZimmer557) and I am currently a Technology Integration Specialist in a school district in Kentucky.  I will be returning to the classroom next school year to teach Social Studies and am looking forward to using and integrating several of the things I have learned since using Twitter professionally.  I also write the blog: The Pursuit of Technology Integration Happiness

 

New to Edchat?

If you have never participated in an #Edchat discussion, these take place twice a day every Tuesday on Twitter. Over 400 educators participate in this discussion by just adding #edchat to their tweets. For tips on participating in the discussion, please check out these posts!

More Edchat

Challenge:

If you’re new to hashtag discussions, then just show up on Twitter on any Tuesday and add just a few tweets on the topic with the hashtag #edchat. 

What do you think? Leave a comment!

May 11, 2011

What is the definition of an educated person and what strategies will get us to reach that goal

#Edchat 05 – 03 – 2011 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST

Thank you to Jeff Richardson (@jrichardson30) for this week’s very enlightening summary. This week’s topic is key to what we are all about on #edchat and if we can’t come close to a definition, how do we decide what we must do in our organisations? The chat was a very interesting one and I think that Jeff has really captured the essence of our dilemma here.  Jeff is a dedicated edchatter and you can read more about him in his bio at the end of the post. Thanks again Jeff!

Looking back over this chat, I am reminded once again that the whole is much greater than the sum of its parts.  These chats are so rich, so challenging and so full of great information that I really don’t know what I did before Twitter, edchats and these critical global conversations.  Each and every time, I am inspired and my thinking is pushed in new directions.  This chat brought so much to the table because the topic is truly at the heart of what we are all trying to do…which is to educate students and ourselves.  

We all must reflect upon and decide for ourselves what it means to be an educated person so that we can use our gifts, passions and abilities better in order to help others become “educated.” We don’t have to agree on all the qualities, and semantics can get in the way on a topic like this, but certain traits do remain consistent throughout this conversation and for me, passion is one of those. It is apparent that if we want a united front and we want to see significant progress, then this topic is something that needs to be discussed at all levels in schools from teachers and students in the classrooms to administrators at the highest levels.

As for this edchat, I think everyone involved peeled back layers, exposed realities and suggested effective ways that we can move closer to our goal.  I know my thinking was challenged and made some great new connections.  Thanks for contributing and I am honored to have the opportunity to put together this summary.       


Here are some of the main themes from the discussion: 

  • Attributes of an educated person
    • creative, curious, searching, passionate, motivated, adaptable
    • a good listener, a life-long learner, has choices
    • someone who knows where to find information
    • Problem-solver, challenge seeker, self-discoverer 
    • Learns from mistakes
  • How to achieve the goal of more educated people
    • Passion needs to be modeled, encouraged, valued & explored
    • Teachers must embody a true, visible passion for learning
    • Students need choice, have a say in their own learning
    • Schools need to be exciting, student-centered if we want students to be “educated”
    • Stop standardizing and start individualizing 
    • Curriculum needs to be more flexible
    • Encourage exploration/discovery
    • Get kids outside! Service learning
    • Personal relationships are critical


Here is a selection of some of the comments: 

With such a vibrant discussion, it’s almost impossible to do it justice in a summary, but I’ve picked out some of the comments that caught my eye.

@jpsteltz:  an educated person knows how to communicate via writing, speaking, listening, and observing #edchat

@jrichardson30:  Someone who can find info & leverage to meet their needs or the needs of others. #edchat

@TutorSolutions:  Educated person must be able to understand the difference between right and wrong. #edchat
@rliberni:  Defining an educated person is not easy, many facets but I think they will be self-sufficient in dealing with the world #edchat

@cybraryman1:  The only person who is truly educated is the one who has learned how to learn & change #edchat
@CTuckerEnglish:  Education is a life-long process of discovery. Teachers must provide students w/skill set necessary to “discover” & learn #edchat
@rliberni: Defining an educated person is not easy-many facets but I think they will be self-sufficient in dealing with the world #edchat
@jpsteltz:  students must have the itch to learn, the willingness to search for answers, and the courage to share with the world #edchat
@msmith833:  A person who learns to make discoveries on his own, not because an assignment is due! #edchat
@Akevy613:  To be educated you need to be willing to learn& grow and to make mistakes along the way but learn from your mistakes #edchat
@Akevy613:  We as educators need to be inspired and passionate about what we do so that we can instill those values and feelings in our students #edchat
@jessievaz12:  @jpsteltz Couldn’t agree more! Involve the students in finding out about what inspires and makes them curious. That’s educated. #edchat

@inquirebook:   Our society so values certainty, but educated people are willing to dwell in uncertainty in order to learn. #edchat 

@westgatehusker:  #edchat give learning real life meaning will encourage passion and the desire to continue learning
@ShellTerrell:  I would like to see educators inspire all students to be lifelong learners! Most schls turn kids off to learning #edchat
@malcolmbellamy:  passion cannot be taught but can be discovered #edchat
@ContentLiteracy: Passion comes from ownership or investment. #edchat
@QZLPatriotHawk:  Life creates more educated ppl than school. School as we know it fosters task completion. #edchat
@jessievaz12:  Tchrs role is to provide context that provokes uncertainty….from there the curiosity and learning are endless. #edchat
@maryannesacco:  if we don’t allow for choice, how do students learn how to make them? #edchat

I would ask that the following question is added to the poll next week:

How can we be disruptive without being dismissed? 

To follow the complete discussion see here

For the stats on #edchat participation see here 


As ever, there were some great links shared:

malcolmbellamy: What would you do? The future of education: building windmills or walls http://wp.me/pKfOP-Qd  #edchat #ukedchat

 @mrsebiology: If You Can’t Reach Them, You Can’t Teach Them (via @ASCD) – http://bit.ly/jWiwea  #edchat #lrnchat #midleved #elemchat

MarjieKnudsen: Bloom’s Taxonomy: Critical Thinking Skills for Kids – http://goo.gl/0j0uL  via @exquisiteminds1 @DrLynneKenney #parenting #edchat #ptchat

GWoodJCG:  http://ning.it/mKYDEs Nourish your soul #edchat teach first with kindness

@cybraryman1: My Learning from Mistakes pg http://cybraryman.com/learningfrommistakes.html   #edchat

@cybraryman1: My Motivating students pg http://cybraryman.com/motivating.html   #edchat

@davidwees:  John Taylor Gatto on “12 Things You Might Not Have Learned in a Classroom” http://bit.ly/mRcLCx

 @InnovativeEdu: Diplomas Don’t Prepare Students for the World. ePortfolios do http://t.co/5hrhhib   #ptchat #edchat #edreform

@pearsonls: 7 Solutions for Engaging 21st Century Students http://ow.ly/4M2Iy via @Marbellis #education #edchat #highered

@voxy:  A Call to Arms for #Education Innovation – http://ow.ly/4M7Ez  via @HuffingtonPost #edchat

@mattledding:  @tomwhitby standardized students need 2b identical so system can b tuned to them. Maybe: http://bit.ly/k72yDw  is a gd picture. #edchat

@elenischool: @pearsonls: 15 Important lessons you may not have learned in school http://ow.ly/4LYt4  via @debsylee #education #edchat

@InnovativeEdu: Have schools forgotten they were supposed to prepare students for the real world? http://t.co/DcU5YvO  #ptchat #edchat #edreform

@ShellTerrell: How do we begin to get schools 2 rely less on testin… (cont) http://deck.ly/~HNrLx

@delta_dc: @wendygorton @jasonflom @usedgov we certainly need to reclaim assessment – my idea here: http://t.co/dTi3yVc

@MN2020: Why are leaders taking us in the wrong direction on education policy? Share your thoughts @ Tuesday Talk: http://bit.ly/k6tW9G  #edchat

@willrich45: Would love your thoughts on this: Have Schools Reached Their Limits? http://huff.to/iwH9pi  #edreform #edchat

web20education: Top 12 Pioneers in Education http://bit.ly/iuDgrN  #edtech20 #elearning #edchat #ukedchat #eduswe #elemchat #lrnchat #elt #efl

@davidwees: Please help refute this argument. “Why Classrooms Should Be Teacher-Centred” http://bit.ly/m5mu2z  

I am @jrichardson30 on the Twitter and my other name is Jeff Richardson.  I’m a tech coach for 3 elementary schoolsin Hoover, Alabama and have been for 4 years.  I taught 8th grade World History for 5 years prior to this.  I consider myself fortunate to be in a district that thinks big, wants to move forward and provides the infrastructure as well as the leadership needed to make it happen.  The biggest thing motivating me as I learn and work to challenge and grow teachers are my own kids.  I have 3 (3 yo, 8 yo, 11 yo) children who go to school in the district where I work. I want to make sure they all have amazing experiences in school.  As a family, we love being outdoors and we are currently learning how to sail.

New to Edchat?

If you have never participated in an #Edchat discussion, these take place twice a day every Tuesday on Twitter. Over 400 educators participate in this discussion by just adding #edchat to their tweets. For tips on participating in the discussion, please check out these posts!

More Edchat

Challenge:

If you’re new to hashtag discussions, then just show up on Twitter on any Tuesday and add just a few tweets on the topic with the hashtag #edchat. 

What do you think? Leave a comment!

April 20, 2011

Can schools be successfully run with shared decision making policies (SDM) or is Principal as sole decision maker the best method

#Edchat 04 – 12 – 2011 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST

Our thanks this week go to Canadian school principal Darcy Mullin for the edchat summary. Although Darcy is quite new to edchat and PLN in general he has already made a big splash with his blog (see address below) and is becoming a star performer at edchat! This was an important topic for teachers and the discussion explored lots of ideas and practices. These have all been captured in a very vivid way in this summary and I am sure that everyone will enjoy reading it. Thank you Darcy. Find out more about Darcy in his bio at te end of the post.

I found today’s #edchat extremely interesting.  What I found particularly interesting was the almost universal agreement that SDM is an effective way to affect school change and that many people were able to cite specific examples of effective SDM in their schools.  As @cybaryman1 pointed out, it was great to have teachers and administrators on the same page and engaged in quality conversation.

Here are some of the main themes from the discussion: 

  • Shared Decision Making (SDM) means just that.  It is important to engage all stakeholders – teachers, students and parents.
  • SDM benefits the school because everyone shares the vision and had a hand in its development.
  • SDM is most effective when a leader is courageous enough to cede control, but maintain focus, take ownership of problems, but give (not take) credit for successes
  • Ultimately, someone (often the principal) must make the final decision, but seeking input from all stakeholders is essential.  Some issues such as contract, salaries etc. are not conducive to the SDM model.
  • Sometimes, with SDM there are too many voices and efficiencies are lost.  It is best to use prudently for decisions that involve many or all stakeholders.
  • When administrators are willing to give up some of the decision-making control they empower staff teams.  That said, if teachers are not willing to be part of the process they must respect the outcomes.
  • In order for the model to be effective there must be a culture of collaboration and trust in the school.

Here is a selection of some of the comments: 
With such a vibrant discussion, it’s almost impossible to do it justice in a summary, but I’ve picked out some of the comments that caught my eye.

@cybaryman1:  Great to see administrators and teachers discussing this here.
@inquirebook:  Creating a rubric is one form of goal setting. Involving students in the process helps them share the goals
@tomwhitby:  Once you’ve got them by the RUBRICS their hearts and minds will follow
@CTuckerEnglish: Letting go of control is scary for many, but the possibilities & potential when all voices are included is infinite
@jonbergman:  Visionary leader needs to rely on their experts and cast the vision collaboratively
@TonyEdTechTip:  along with Trust..follow through is important. Every1 has to do what they said they are going to do
@QZLPatriotHawk: No decision I’ve made as a principal has worked better than the ones my teachers & students have made.
@UltimateTeacher: SDM will raise teacher’s job satisfaction…which is highly needed now. The question is how much to give?
@fliegs: No 1 person has the right answer but collectively we can find common best fit
@davidwees: Everyone involved in SDM have their own agendas. You can’t make a decision without a perspective
@ericjuli: I think admins need to create a culture of Shared Decision Making, aligned to core values that whole school community agrees with
@jessievaz12: The only thing you MUST ensure is shared understanding of the vision or goal. W/out that you are sunk with shared decisions.
@thomsponscience: Sustaining commitment can happen when people are given REAL responsibility, not just asked for opinions
@davidwees: You can’t turn SDM on and off. Once the genie is out of the bottle, people will expect input (which is OK!)
@tomwhitby: It is always difficult to buy into someone else’s vision. A vision developed by a team is easily adopted by the team
@QZLPatriotHawk: I have found the best admin are the ones that take blame for failures and give away credit for school successes.
@davidwees: Advantages of SDM: Students get opportunity to learn HOW to make decisions.

To follow the complete discussion see here 

For the stats on #edchat participation see here 

As ever, there were some great links shared:

@NewVictory: Incredible. Empower more principals! RT @alizag: The Fragile Success of School Reform in the Bronx – http://nyti.ms/gBfsiI

cybraryman1:  Flowchart of the Shared Decision-Making Process (District level – adapt to school level) http://tinyurl.com/3ufwr7x  #edchat

@tomwhitby: Agreed! RT @L_Hilt: Awesome. @datruss Open Educator Manifesto | Connected Principals http://bit.ly/eeCjRB  #cpchat #edchat

@amandacdykes I Don’t Rock http://bit.ly/gVw7Qf  #edchat

4thGrdTeach My district’s technology plan http://ow.ly/4yCUC #edchat 

 This is Darcy Mullin.  He is a Principal in a small rural school in British Columbia, Canada.  He lives in  Summerland which is located in the beautiful Okanagan Valley.
I am relatively new to the world of twitter, blogging and using social media as a learning tool.  I am excited and empowered by the learning I am able to be a part of as I navigate this new medium.  I am very interested in Personalized Learning and student engagement. I am always looking to learn and connect.  Please feel free to drop by my blog darcymullin.wordpress.com and leave a comment.

 

New to Edchat?

If you have never participated in an #Edchat discussion, these take place twice a day every Tuesday on Twitter. Over 1,000 educators participate in this discussion by just adding #edchat to their tweets. For tips on participating in the discussion, please check out these posts!

More Edchat

 

Challenge:

If you’re new to hashtag discussions, then just show up on Twitter on any Tuesday and add just a few tweets on the topic with the hashtag #edchat. 

What do you think? Leave a comment!

September 3, 2010

How do teachers, experts in education, gain a voice in the education reform movement that targets them as a problem?

#Edchat  8-31-2010 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST  

   

Effecting Educational reform

 

Tuesday’s #edchat was something different to say the least! Firstly it was invaded by ‘tech Gremlins’ (as described by @esolcourses) with both moderators experiencing twitter and connection problems. (Thank you to all those edchatters who stepped in to rescue the situation!) At first two topics were making the rounds – but things finally settled down and in true PLN-collaborative-form #Edchat forged ahead.   The task of  writing the summary this week has been valiantly undertaken by Jarrod Drysdale (@knackisms). Although not a teacher, Jarrod works in the field of education and technology so he gives us a bit of a birds-eye view on this topic! Thank you Jarrod for stepping up to the plate to provide the summary of what was one of the strangest #edchats to date! See Jarrod’s bio at the end of the post.   

 While #edchat participants are frustrated with having a target painted upon their foreheads, they’re still motivated and excited to participate in education reform. Educators want to shift the conversation to the positive and work together with the community to make necessary changes. Educators desire respect and trust, and are willing to do the hard work. Conversations made clear that teachers need to get more involved with current events and focus upon the big picture rather than just the scope of their individual classrooms. In addition, educators need to better inform the public, including politicians and parents, of the challenges they face.  

Here are some of the main themes from the discussion:    

  ●        Teachers need to stand up and communicate the reality of what is happening in schools.  

 ●        Change the story to focus on all the positive achievements by educators.  

 ●        Teachers need to get involved with local elections and the press.  

 ●        Trust is critical among teachers, administrators, and parents.  

 ●        Teachers face a lot of negativity in the press, communities, professional circles, and politics.  

 ●        Learning is the responsibility of students, families and educators together.  

 ●        It’s difficult to define what makes a teacher effective, but teachers are best equipped to evaluate their peers.  

 Here is a selection of some of the comments:    

  @MissCheska:  I think first and foremost to affect change is to encourage transparency in what’s going on in our own classrooms #edchat  

  @baldy7:   #edchat if educators/teachers want to have a voice, they need to stand up and be heard. Too much being done to them!  

  @cybraryman1:   Educators have to educate the policy makers and get more say in their decisions. #edchat  

  @blairteach:   Tchrs also need to take a leaf from the PR handbook & publicize the INCREDIBLE things going on in sch; counter-programming to bad. #edchat  

  @tracymercier:  Even if we are tenured, when you do say no, disagree/stand up you are ignored (just shut up & do it) #edchat  

  @baldy7:   #edchat education is perceived as a noble field, but one that “anyone” could do. we allow the perception to exist.  

  @ImagineLearning:   I am seeing a general thread that the school-home connection is an important step to this issue #edchat  

  @tomwhitby:  How can we get local communities on brd with tchrs not even knowing what to address?If we don’t get it, how can we expect others to? #Edchat  

  @PeacefulSchools:  Communication between schools and families can often be a great struggle. #Edchat  

  @TheDSCWay:  Teachers are easy to attack because they are the most visible and people know what they are supposed to be doing (or think they do) #edchat  

  @rgallwitz:  What makes a great teacher? Results or relationships? #edchat  

  @lisamireles:   #Edchat how about by changing the story? Talk about teachers as the solution not the problem…  

  @Smichael920:   #edchat the more parents r involved in their chdns ed, the more respect they have 4 tchrs. Mayb more politicians should spend time in sch!  

  @JasonFlom:   Think globally, Elect locally. Teachers need to be involved in their local elections. Call out misrepresentations by candidates. #edchat  

  @JasonFlom:   Teachers need to write letters to ed, op-ed pieces, and other bits of opinion to balance one-sided representation. #edchat  

  @TheDSCWay:   If you haven’t taught, it is hard to imagine all of the competing directions teachers are pulled in. It is a hard job! #edchat  

  @leaguelearn:   Public clings to tests ’cause that’s what they know & remember, need to see rigorous alt assess in person – student led portfolios #edchat  

  @michellek107:   As educators, & more spec, teachers, we need to encourage local media to come see what we are doing WELL! Beyond test scores. #edchat  

  @davidwees:   Politicians need to stop thinking of education as a short-term objective and more of a long term investment in our well-being. #edchat  

  @michellek107:   As a teacher, I MUST help my community understand that students’ edu needs are different than they were 5, 10, 50 yrs ago. #edchat  

  To follow the complete discussion see here    

  For the stats on #edchat participation see here    

  As ever, there were some great links shared:   

 @ImagineLearning: Newsweek gives case study of PLB helping the “Creativity Crisis” http://bit.ly/dj6W1F  

 @Parentella I interviewed @vickysaumell about using Project Based Learning: http://edition.tefl.net/guest/vicky-saumell/  

 CoCreatr:  @blairteach teachers can #innovate around pressures through developing “growth mindset” http://bit.ly/97XJFN  via @jorgebarba  

 briankotts:  Teachers, public sharply divided on key issues | BostonGlobe http://bit.ly/dzu1F3  

 leahmacvie:  I think the best way to assert your voice is to start a movement. Blog, tweet, gain followers. http://bit.ly/aoeO8Y  

 getschooled: One student drops out of high school every 26 seconds (1.2 million/yr). http://ow.ly/2xlF0  

 andycinek:   What will you say on day one? http://bit.ly/bF7aJG  #edchat #edcamp #ntcamp [Day one is critical, and this is great! ^CB]  

 joe_bower:  I am listening to Richard Byrne’s Reform Symposium presentation on Back Channeling. http://bit.ly/bUO9zU  #abed #edchat  

moehlert: #TED must watch! “The World Needs All Kinds of Minds” by Temple Grandin http://bit.ly/8XReoV  via @rkiker @dcinc66 #edchat   

ImagineLearning:  Education is the silver bullet. Education is everything West wing cilp starts at 40 sec http://bit.ly/aOEkoo   

davidwees:  @MissCheska Read this article I wrote about comparison between education and other fields of study. Much clearer. http://is.gd/eNDD6  #edchat   

SkippingRobyn:  We all want to help students succeed, but being a HS teacher can be tough work! Are you up for the challenge? http://ow.ly/2xpq4  #edchat   

CoCreatr:  @blairteach that is the point. Check Professor Carol Dweck’s research in the video http://bit.ly/97XJFN after #edchat 😉   

mikeoconnor1982:  Tips for Engaging Your Audience (be it students or adults) http://t.co/qbJqjvI   

fullonlearning:  http://tinyurl.com/2utphxf “If everyone could educate, we could educate everyone” #edchat #gtchat   

briankotts:  Why We Must Fire Bad Teachers | Newsweek http://bit.ly/apGE8h  #edchat   

cybraryman1:  My Education Reform page of links: http://bit.ly/diXT0v  #edchat   

web20classroom:   Cool Prezi On Problem Based Learning: http://bit.ly/9R3Ojc  #jccstech #edchat   

MatthiasHeil:  Children can learn from bad teachers! http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/10590460   

ImagineLearning:  research shows that kids who have 2, 3, 4 strong tchers in a row will eventually excl Newsweek #edchat http://bit.ly/btRz5c   

davidwees:   The death of the amateur mathematician. Why it is critical to invest in education. http://bit.ly/9Nmc5a   

Smichael920:  Short post on sharing good news w/children, govs & staff (Every) Photo (tells a) Story: http://wp.me/pvUIF-57  #edchat this helps us   

JoHart:  Other TZs post http://bit.ly/92XdGs  wth overview & rec link recent Edublogs Webinar “Your PLN what’s in it for all of us!” #edchat   

blairteach: Yeah, the long-term PD thing is tough. PLP was huge for this. http://bit.ly/aG6w0f   

smartinez:  Focus on results can make children do worse, study finds http://bit.ly/9IaEcA  #edreform #edparadox #edchat   

ToughLoveforXhttp://ilnk.me/41c8 Syllabus: My fav” (so far) 4. How Do We Know What We (Think We) Know? #edchat   

LesLinks: Plse read @ljconrads new blogpost… excellent call to arms for US ed system.. http://bit.ly/aVwqgT  #edchat #elemchat #gtchat #gifted #teach   

LesLinks:  It has been really interesting & exciting to be here will come again!! more info on #gtchat at http://www.ingeniosus.net/gtchat  #edchat   

ImagineLearning:  just used BlastFollow to follow everyone from today’s #edchat http://bit.ly/9ZEKpu   

blairteach:  I’ve been using http://youtu.be/nBJV56WUDng  to show that the way we always do something may not be the best way to do it. #edchat   

davidwees: New blog post: Every educator should experience being a bad student. http://bit.ly/9BfPGP   

Jarrod Drysdale is a professional designer living in Denver. He recently built and launched a new web application called Knack For Teachers, and is emphatically devoted to assisting educators via technology. Jarrod has worked on everything from movie websites to digital advertising to financial software, all for national companies and household brand names. He’s decided education is where it’s at. Four of Jarrod’s immediate family members are educators. He blogs actively at the Knack Blog   

  

New to Edchat?   

If you have never participated in an #Edchat discussion, these take place twice a day every Tuesday on Twitter. Over 1,000 educators participate in this discussion by just adding #edchat to their tweets. For tips on participating in the discussion, please check out these posts!   

●        Edchat: Join the Conversation   

●        Using Tweetdeck for Hashtag Discussions   

More Edchat          

If you would like to join others in transforming the discussion into action, please feel free to join the Edchat group on the Educator PLN ningJerry Swiatek does an incredible job of posting each archived transcript on the Edchat wiki created by Steve Johnson. This way you can look back at your favorites!  Find previous summaries here on this blog – see edchat category on right sidebar. Follow other Edchatters and make sure you are on this Twitter list if you participate in Edchat! Read summaries of the 7pm EST/1 am CET Edchat discussions.  

 Challenge:  

If you’re new to hashtag discussions, then just show up on Twitter on any Tuesday and add just a few tweets on the topic with the hashtag #edchat.  

What do you think? Leave a comment!

August 12, 2010

Creating a teacher workshop

The idea of  deepening and expanding learning by living and studying together is something which has underpinned education for many years and can be seen in many different cultures. The UK boarding school and university systems were created under this principle and many other educational systems through time have seen the value of this shared way of life. With this in mind,  I set out to create a teacher development workshop for a small group of practising teachers.   

The workshops would last for a week, bring together 6 teachers to explore, share and learn. I created a rudimentary timetable which I hoped would give us a basis from which to begin our short, learning journey but which would be broad enough to allow us to travel in any direction we desired during the week.   

I also wanted to have a focus away from, yet related to English language teaching which could help to develop our own personal language and  have local flavour. I chose the Bronte novels. I grew up very near Bronte country and had always enjoyed both the place and the novels. They are universally known, great stories to read and discuss and we could also look at the place of literature in the English language classroom. We would read/re-read our favourites before the workshop, discuss them, visit Howarth, take the walk in the surrounding moors and then watch the films in the evenings.   

The land of the Brontes

Everything was in place and now the only thing was to see who (if anybody) might be interested in such an experience! I have to admit to a lack of research on the matter and I went ahead feeling that as this was something I would love to do then there may be others who would too!   

Fortunately I was right and in June I had my group. Three were teachers from my twitter PLN (Eva, Culya and Alex) and two I knew personally (Blanca and Merces). I was thrilled and very excited about bringing all of these teachers together. In the end Merces wasn’t able to join us but the others were intrepid even though the trip to Yorkshire required a train journey from London!   

    

 On Sunday evening August 1st we were finally together!   

Hard at work!

For the rest of the week we shared experiences, ideas, knowledge, camaraderie and food.   

We looked at grammar and skills and explored ways of moving all of these online using an amazing array of tools shown to us by Alex and Eva. We explored humour, some weird and wonderful vocabulary, quirky ideas for class activities and of course those brooding Bronte novels.   

On the first night I realised that my DVD purchase of  Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights and The Tennant of Wildfell Hall was not, as I had though three films but the BBC series comprising over 10 hours of footage!! Undaunted we decided to give it a whirl and set out to watch all of the episodes through the week. It was a bit of a race to the end but we managed it staying up until midnight each evening ploughing through each story.   

The advantage of the BBC series was that we were presented with more of the story and particularly with Wuthering Heights, which we all hated, we saw more of the dark truth behind the novels than we would have done with a shorter film version. It turned out to be a very intense and emotional engagement with the stories.   

 

At Home with the Brontes

The Bronte walk (which was longer than anticipated) gave us a good feel for the place and we were delighted by their house yet saddened by their plight.   

Bronte Bridge and Waterfall

There were unexpected bonuses too! We had Spanish peppers and Turkish shepherd’s salad for lunch. Turkish coffee and Turkish delight during our shared edchat session, a delightful Madeira wine for aperitif and of course, afternoon tea! We were even invited to a local organic farm for a tour and to sample Yorkshire specialities.   

Alex the Horse Whisperer

Alex fell in love with our sheepdog Maguire and took him off for walks (although at times it was not certain who was taking whom!) Our other little dog, Duffy, who is less of a handful, trotted along with the others as they explored the local countryside.   

 

It was a unique experience and I hope everyone agrees. To hear an account straight from the horse’s mouth, so to speak, see Eva’s beautiful piece ‘Far Far Away From The Madding Crowd‘ and  Teacher Workshops. Alex’s fantastic account Amazing Stories of Sharing  and Culya’s lovely summary of the experience The Adventure of my Life. Eva made a Glogster too!

A Visit to a pub - naturally!

For me it was a rich and rewarding experience and it proved a point:  

 if you take a group of dedicated and committed  teachers and place them around a table real or virtual, they will grow and learn together.

 English language students can come and stay with me for immersion courses all year round – one to one or in groups of up to 4 people (come with colleagues or friends).  Our next Teacher Workshop  is scheduled for January.

June 3, 2010

Advantages and pitfalls of educators being evaluated by student test scores

Merit pay based on student test scores

Edchat

6-1-2010 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST

Our #Edchat summary this week has been written by another passionate edchatter Adam Burk (@pushingupward). I’m sure you will agree that Adam has done a great job in capturing well what was a very insightful and lively debate. Adam is a great campaigner for reform, not just in education. Read his blogs for more information. Links to these and bio below.

The news is filled with stories about our failing public education system in the United States. Lately, a lot of focus has been put on teachers as a significant cause of the problems in schools. This week #edchat’s focus was on one of the current leading proposals to improve performance in our schools: Accountability of teachers based on their students’ scores on standardized tests. For example, Race to the Top funding is contingent on states breaking through union blocks to create such measures for teacher evaluation. Race to the Top measures are similar to current programs which thus far are failing in Chicago according to preliminary findings. Nonetheless, just like No Child Left Behind was shoved down public school’s throats, here comes more mis-guided reliance on high-stake testing to prove not only students’ ability, but teachers’ as well.

During this #edchat discussion it was made clear that the emphasis on high-stake standardized tests is not welcomed by this group of educational professionals. Potential advantages of said proposal were not clearly identified. It undermines efforts to implement meaningful change in pedagogy to support students to be successful in the information age. Standardized tests are a tool in public education that divorces students from their inherent passion for learning. Schools need to become places that foster passion and creativity both in students and teachers. Current proposals in education reform fail to do this. Innovation in assessment and accountability are needed, this is agreed upon, but what exactly this looks like is not. If tests are to be used, they must learn to share the spotlight with other forms of assessment and feedback. There is support from some for 360 degree reviews where student, peer, parent, and administrator feedback is utilized to comprise a comprehensive review.

But even before we define our evaluation methods we must redefine education in the United States. Even with higher test scores our students and schools will not be meeting the needs and challenges of today’s and tomorrow’s workplace, nor our global situation. Thus, we must align our purpose of education with aiding students to be inspired, sophisticated, thinkers, doers, and citizens, who actually are prepared to meet the challenges that are before them.

Here are some of the main themes from the discussion:

  • High-stake standardized testing ruins creativity
  • Higher quality means of assessment should be emphasized and fostered instead of standardized tests.
  • Merit Pay based on high-stake standardized testing erodes collaboration in schools and promotes self-interest
  • High-stake standardized testing creates a high risk for increase in cheating
  • Merit pay will create environments where “difficult” or “behind” students are not wanted on a class roster
  • Merit pay is designed for businesses dependent upon sales, not for issues of human development
  • Test scores as one of many pieces of diverse information may be an acceptable means of teacher evaluation
  • If tests are used they should be created by teachers to support their curriculum design and to inform students and teachers of strengths and weaknesses as part of a diverse assessment strategy
  • Fundamental change in our educational paradigm is needed
  • Measuring success by means of test scores is the wrong focus
  • The logistics for implementing teacher evaluation based on student performance on high-stakes standardized tests may be ridiculous
  • Student performance is more complex than teacher performance, e.g., poverty, nutrition, parents
  • Standardized tests are flawed with cultural biases and focus on low-level thinking
  • Standardized tests may persist because they create a safe place where teachers are absolved of responsibility for creating something better
  • To define what good teaching looks like we must first redefine education; otherwise we are bolstering bad habits.

Here is a selection of some of the comments:

With such a vibrant discussion, it’s almost impossible to do it justice in a summary, but I’ve picked out some of the comments that caught my eye.

@MissCheska #edchat I think teaching to the test focuses more on fact-based instruction than a more holistic instruction; it loses sight of bigger pic.

@rkiker #edchat I think the greatest measurement of teacher evaluation are authentic student evaluations/feedback – although they can be dangerous

@GaryBrannigan Meaningful assessment should be built into the instructional process #edchat

@bjnichols Eval. should be tied to real outcomes/growth of students. Not the ability to bubble & answer mult. choice questions #edchat

@k_shelton @techmunoz So a highly tech person like myself would be evaluated by who? And based upon what? #edchat

@tomwhitby Do we now need to give every class in every grade a standardized test so that we may evaluate every teacher? #edchat

@k_shelton It’s not fair to evaluate a teacher’s performance, when you have students that don’t even get breakfast before the school day #edchat

@shighla It’s important for formative assessment to be part of the teaching and learning process.    #edchat

@tucksoon Both teachers and students are judged by standardized tests. Both will lose out in the end. A looping vicious cycle #edchat

@ShellTerrell With high-stakes tests there are already teachers who don’t want to teach the kids that are behind the prob will grow #edchat

@Harmerj Interesting #edchat. problem with performance-related pay is the many many many diff variables u wld have to use to evaluate performance!

@tomwhitby With so much riding on the test, we have shifted the focus from learning to successful test taking. #edchat

@michellek107 Our kids are tested relentlessly. There is no joy in learning. Sad to always hear, “Is this for a grade/on the test?” #edchat

@rliberni I feel we look too much to industry 4 our models shouldn’t we be more creative with our own industry? #edchat

@seanbanville @Harmerj Excellence needs to be determined by the teaching team – vote for whoever contributed most/best  #edchat

@phystweeter Teacher evaluations that I have experienced have not been in depth.  Most evaluators don’t know enough about content to evaluate it. #edchat

@bjnichols Creativity is all about risk taking.  Tying performance to a single measure would greatly diminish creativity in classrooms. #edchat

@datadiva Hammers are used to smash car windows, but no one is clamoring to ban them. We need change how we view tests in their rightful place #edchat

@phystweeter Perhaps this is an unpopular opinion, but I welcome merit pay.  Why shouldn’t those who do more get paid more?  #edchat

@jenclevette Part of my eval is my Prof Growth Plan, which is a living document of what I believe I need to work on.  #edchat

@michellek107 @ShellTerrell eval me on student engagement, continuing prof dev, growth as tchr, effective teaching, leadership opp’s I take. #edchat

@pushingupward @ShellTerrell Motivation should be intrinsic motivation based on passion to learn. Schools annihilate this inherent passion. #edchat

@drtimony @jenclevette responsible educators and analysts should be able to use testing as part of a profile of assessment.  #edchat

@MZimmer557 I will gladly take merit based pay if we create a method of merit based parenting!  #edchat

@PodPirate …unfortunately we need to start offering solid solutions to this problem or somebody else is going to make decisions for us. #edchat

@drtimony Let teachers choose how they are evaluated. Imagine that. Let them set goals and achieve/exceed. Like we should do with kids. #edchat

@rjwassink #edchat My union contract says I get a raise every year… whether I improve or not.  Why???

@tomwhitby The teacher is only one aspect of a student’s learning. How do we test Family, Culture, Environment and Health? Other tests? #edchat

@colport It is interesting how many teachers actually like standardised tests…it appears to be a safety zone for them #edchat

@ladyteachkdg All that really matters is the learning that happens with our students when “the rubber meets the road” in our classrooms #edchat

@Smichael920 If testing does have a place it’s to support & inform teacher assessment not their pay #edchat

@Mamacita Teaching to a test is easy.  Takes no brains, no guts, no creativity, no personality, and no originality.  Just read the script. #edchat

I would ask that the following question is added to the poll next week:

How are public schools aligned or misaligned to develop a citizenry prepared to deal with the issues of today and tomorrow including humanitarian, ecological, economic, and political crises?

To follow the complete discussion see here

For the stats on #edchat participation see here

As ever, there were some great links shared:

JamiePortman:  Tooble is gr8 free software 4 borrowing videos from Youtube. http://bit.ly/bYi5Rh

kevcreutz: Point by point discussion on negative effect of testing http://bit.ly/99N35i

leahmacvie: Choice: School Choice in America – http://tinyurl.com/38ade35

web20education: Share and rt http://www.sharetabs.com/?web20socialmediaeducation Web 2.0 and social media  in  education

datruss: What makes a Great Teacher http://bit.ly/bn9cLX

pushingupward: Consider new standards to redefine school. Fixed process vs. fixed content. http://ow.ly/1SyvD

rushtheiceberg:  Don’t Cripple Kids w/ Compassion!  http://bit.ly/ahr8Y8

datruss: See Dan Pink on Motivation http://youtu.be/u6XAPnuFjJc Are good teachers the type to be motivated by merit pay?

Teachers_Speak: If anyone missed the special about education and testing, merit pay- here is link – http://usaguns.net/patriots/minds.html

edudemic: Follow everything happening on today’s #edchat discussion with our LIVE STREAM page on EduDemic. (Just upgraded!) http://bit.ly/cUg80b

rosamariatorres: (video) Challenging current “common sense” on Merit Pay for Teachers http://bit.ly/4r4R2w

drtimony: absolutely you can. we all break. solution? success. RT @BrandiJClark: Can you fix broken teachers? http://bit.ly/aiSXMr

PodPirate: @debra47 http://tinyurl.com/2ef5eeo here you go

tomwhitby: This is the latest Post from Sean Banville. I enjoyed this and recommend it. http://bit.ly/b0dk5G

rachelala: for deep thinking and understanding of formative assessment see Dylan Wiliam’s work http://bit.ly/cWUxu3

ransomtech: Would u agree 2 transfer 2 a struggling middle school 4 2 years in exchange 4 a $20,000 bonus? http://bit.ly/aPTGqw

CrudBasher: My #edchat contribution: How Do We Evaluate Teachers? http://bit.ly/cpLqhb

tomwhitby: I’ve noticed when I recommend posts from others everyone follows.When I do my own-Zippo . Digital Pointers? http://bit.ly/86CKmb

Adam Burk can only be defined as one thing for sure, a human being. Bound by this condition he does the best he can to learn, grow, play, do good, and be of service. He believes we are largely looking the wrong way in our discussions in education reform. Ultimately, we must be talking about cultural reform, developing profoundly sane personalities for planetary citizenship. This looks like individuals contributing to the aims of The Earth Charter and is the enactment of Aldo Leopold’s Land Ethic.

While his activities are many–philosopher, wilderness guide, teacher, social worker, gardener, husband, dog whisperer, naturalist, cook, jewelry maker, lover, healer, writer, community activist, change agent, and more–he is guided by the simple principle to do good in the service of others. He lives on the beautiful coast of Maine. Adam blogs at Pushing Upward: Growing a Culture of Peace and Cooperative Catalyst. He can be reached at pushingupward@gmail.com and found on twitter as @pushingupward.

New to Edchat?

If you have never participated in an #Edchat discussion, these take place twice a day every Tuesday on Twitter. Over 400 educators participate in this discussion by just adding #edchat to their tweets. For tips on participating in the discussion, please check out these posts!

More Edchat

Challenge:

If you’re new to hashtag discussions, then just show up on Twitter on any Tuesday and add just a few tweets on the topic with the hashtag #edchat.

What do you think? Leave a comment!

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