Rliberni's Blog – Radical language

November 8, 2011

What forms of formative assessment do you use, and do you grade them for the overall average?

#Edchat 10 – 18 – 2011 – 18:00 CET 12 PM EST

Thanks again to Sarah Fudin for this  #edchat summary.  I’m sorry that we have got a bit behind with these but should be caught up by the end of the week.

Thank you again Sarah for yet another insightful piece! See Sarah’s bio at the end of the post.

Not being a teacher at this current time in my life, it’s hard for me to give the most validated response to this question, but I’ll try.  From my short time teaching in the past and my current time building a community of teachers, I’ve found that the learner is in charge of the learning.  Formative assessment that keeps the learner involved the whole way through seems like the best type of assessment — self-assessment, highly involved feedback and many chances to measure improvement seem to me to be of top importance.  As far as grading formative assessment for the overall average, I’m not sure I agree — different types of assessment for different learners will most likely yield drastically different results, some weighing in more important than others.

These were some of the main points discussed

  1. What exactly is formative assessment? — Feedback given to students to improve their understanding.
  2. Explore many types of formative assessments: stop lights, targets, short answers, hands-up, interactive whiteboards, written assessments, self assessments, wikis, and polling.
  3. Monitoring learning throughout a lesson is important — modify if students are not understanding.
  4. Formative assessment is ongoing not just something you do at the end of a term or year.
  5. Keep in mind that not all students learn the same way or react the same way to certain assessment.
  6. Poll anywhere AKA polls via mobile devices are a great way to bring learning outside the classroom as well as get some immediate feedback.
  7. Getting your students to think about the feedback and not the grade can be challenging, but it’s important.
  8. Schools can help teachers use formative assessment to meet student needs — a schools outlook, flexibility, and culture can encourage an atmosphere where effective and variable formative assessment are possible.
  9. Allowing students to set goals and then talking with them, not at them, about your feedback and theirs may be an effective form of formative assessment.

These were a few tweets that caught my eye:   

  1. @jessievaz12: ongoing, observational, exploratory, student focused, bite-sized (in response to adjectives to describe formative assessment)
  2. @weisburghm: assessment of learning, for learning, and as learning. Formative is the last two, right?
  3. @FinEdChat: What about using ‘poll everywhere’ so the students can be engaged using
  4. their phones? A great method for student collaboration
  5. @west4me: I think it is fine to grade formative assessments, but do you use the grade for you or them?
  6. @mingchri Yes, assessments are not just for students, but for teachers to see if concepts were achieved by students
  7. @rliberni: polls on mobiles are gr8 for this, finding out quickly what stds have grasped & what needs reviewing
  8. @CoachCreach: I use twtpoll.com for FA. It allows me to gain a better understanding of the studts learning process and grades me on my teaching.
  9. @CTuckerEnglish: Building in time to reflect is key to growth & dev. Most kids don’t slow down to think about feedback.
  10. @delta_dc: We need to find ways to support learners’ ability to take responsibility for their own formative assessment.
  11. @TestSoup: Formative helps you get there. Summative analyzes performance there.
  12. @CTuckerEnglish: I love showing students the self-editing I do on my own writing-red pen explosion-so they see all writers need to edit
  13. @chiyanlam: Grading is about applying a value judgement; not the same thing as providing feedback and “marking” an assignment.
  14. @tomwhitby: If Formative assessment is for the tchr to see how much kids get it in order to adjust the lesson,why assign a grade to the student?
  15. @cybraryman1: No grades for #edchat but thanks for your outstanding participation & my wonderful co-moderators @rliberni @ShellTerrell & @tomwhitby

These were useful links shared:   

  1. @DrThomasHo: http://drthomasho.visibli.com/share/Ws5oVH — getting students to reflect on their work vs their grade.
  2. @weisburghm: http://www.thewritingteacher.org/writing-blog-home/2009/1/15/how-to-introduce-the-6-traits.html — Suggestions on how to give feedback on writing.
  3. @FractusLearning: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=179866995428249&set=a.178156932265922.44868.165101000238182&type=1 — Cartoon: Calvin’s thoughts on homework.
  4. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2011/04/11/edutopia_projectbased.html — Project-based learning via edutopia.
  5. @keelygriffiths: http://keelygriffiths.wordpress.com/2011/08/07/dont-let-formative-assessment-become-summative/ — not letting formative assessment become summative.

I would ask that the following question is added to the poll next week:    

What makes someone a great teacher candidate? —  is it their schooling, their background, or their experiences?

   
Sarah Fudin is a Community Manager for the University of Southern California’s Master of Arts in Teaching program, which provides aspiring teachers the opportunity to earn an online teaching degree.  USC also partners with Teacher Certification Map to offer information on teacher salary by state.  Outside of work Sarah enjoys running, reading and Pinkberry frozen yogurt.

@USCTeacher

 

 

New to Edchat?

If you have never participated in an #Edchat discussion, these take place twice a day every Tuesday on Twitter. Over 1,000 educators participate in this discussion by just adding #edchat to their tweets. For tips on participating in the discussion, please check out these posts!

More Edchat

Challenge:

If you’re new to hashtag discussions, then just show up on Twitter on any Tuesday and add just a few tweets on the topic with the hashtag #edchat. 

What do you think? Leave a comment!

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. This is a great drawing excercise that shows their understanding of the color spectrum and how they view themselves through drawing.

    Comment by Ariana Berrington z — December 26, 2011 @ 2:56 am | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: